Category Archives: Enlightened Entrepreneurship

More summer reading!

MERGER MANIAC, Novel #3  in the DALE HUNTER SERIES is now ready for early Reader Review.

If you're interested, I'd love to hear your first impression or your reaction to the first 10 pages, or if you have time for a quick summer read of 200 pages, to send me your review comments. More stories of crime, Mafia, suspense and intrigue for Dale Hunter & Frank the Fixer.  A free ebook copy is available at @ BookHip.com/GBFVVV 
 
If you need to catch up from the beginning of the series, or you would like to share the first two novels, you can follow the links below to a free ebook for both.  A short synopsis of each novel is at the bottom of this email.
NO EASY MONEY, the first novel in the series introduces Dale Hunter and Frank the Fixer and stories of crime in the international computer business of the 1980s. It was published in September 2018 and is receiving very good response from readers and reviewers online and in bookstores across Canada and internationally.
A free ebook copy is available at @ BookHip.com/QBDRJC 
SIMPLY THE BEST, the second novel in the series, was published in May and is now also widely distributed online, in bookstores and libraries, anywhere you want it. It continues the stories of Dale Hunter and Frank the Fixer with more threats of death and disaster.
A free ebook copy is available at @ BookHip.com/LWMLBC
For more background on the the books or on my adventure as an Author-Entrepreneur, please visit or  follow me on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, LinkedIn or my updated my Author website at  www.DelvinChatterson.com with to the online bookstores and referral sites like Goodreads. See: Dale Hunter Novels
I have also set-up an Author Direct Bookstore to facilitate delivery of Author-signed copies of the novels to bookstores and readers at the best prices with low-cost delivery anywhere in North America.
All the tools are here to help everyone Buy, Read, Review & Recommend the books. Please!

THANK YOU for your continued support.  Helpful, enthusiastic readers are still the best resource for better writing, marketing and sales.  Enjoy your reading!
Del 
 
Author WebsiteDelvinChatterson.com
NO EASY MONEY - You never win playing by the rules...  The first in the series of Dale Hunter Crime Novels is an explosive mix of crime, cash and computers in the 1980s. Entrepreneurs face challenges every day. It's hard to be a hero. This is the story of a young entrepreneur under threats of violence from the Montreal Mafia. He wants to survive and not play by gangster rules, but it will require courage and creativity and the support of some new friends. Somebody is going to get killed.
SIMPLY THE BEST - It may be simple, it's never easy  In this second novel in the series, Dale Hunter is back in business, but so is Gino Boncanno. Hunter has already had to save himself from a murder attempt by the gangster, Boncanno. Now his new partner in Taiwan is dragging him into business with the Triads and their smuggling scheme into the U.S. The danger escalates and Hunter still has to save his family from the murderous plans of Boncanno. Hunter's escape may seem simple, but it's never easy.
MERGER MANIAC - Some offers have to be refused  Third in the series of Dale Hunter crime novels, Merger Maniac is the story of how Dale Hunter tries to survive against competitive threats in the rapidly evolving computer business of the 1980s. He's looking for merger or acquisition partners and suddenly he's approached by the aggressive Montreal Mafia to join their money laundering schemes. They are making very persuasive offers that just have to be refused.
 
Delvin Chatterson, Author
An entrepreneur and business advisor, consultant, coach and cheerleader for entrepreneurs, Del has written extensively on business topics for decades. He is now writing fiction with a short story collection in progress and this series of Dale Hunter crime novels. Originally from the Rocky Mountains of British Columbia, Del has lived and worked for the past forty years in the fascinating French-Canadian city of Montreal, Quebec.

Learning & Storytelling - Presentation/Seminar including Author Sale & Book-signing.

July 11th, 5-à-7 Bureau en gros, @ St. Charles & Transcanadienne, Kirkland, QC.

 

YOU'RE INVITED:

Which do you prefer - Fact or Fiction?

 Business text book or crime fiction with an entrepreneur as hero?

Entrepreneurs learn best by sharing stories - Fact or Fiction?  A boring business textbook or a crime thriller with the entrepreneur as hero?

What are the differences between my business books and the crime novels?

Real-life stories:

  • More facts!
  • More details
  • More useful to understand and apply the strategies, tactics & techniques

Crime Fiction:

  • More fun to read and to write!
  • More creative ideas and inspiration
  • Easier to remember the guiding principles
  • Introduces a new and wider audience
  • Allows more subtle cheerleading for entrepreneurs and the promotion of Enlightened Entrepreneurship

Everyone learns by sharing stories. But the choice of fact or fiction is all yours.

You're welcome to join the seminar on July 11th. All the books are available online or at your favourite bookstore. Please have a look, then try, buy, read, review and share with a friend.

Thank you!

Entrepreneurs learn best by sharing stories - Fact or Fiction?

A boring business textbook or a crime thriller with the entrepreneur as hero?

As an experienced entrepreneur and business advisor, I often tell stories as an effective means of communicating with other entrepreneurs. Storytelling helps to establish rapport based on shared experience and a good story makes the message more memorable. Sharing stories always makes for a better exchange of ideas, information and inspiration.

I have shared stories with business associates, clients and colleagues for many years and recently published two business books for entrepreneurs that included many real-life stories. I am now writing a series of crime fiction novels with an entrepreneur as hero and the stories have been made more interesting and entertaining for a wider audience. All of the books communicate messages for and about entrepreneurs through storytelling.

So what are the differences between Fact – true-life stories and Fiction – creative writing to add more drama, mystery and suspense?

What is the effect on the message delivered and the lessons learned? What are the perspectives of the entrepreneur and of the storyteller? What works best for different audiences?

The curriculum for entrepreneurs to learn about all stages of their business would include these subjects:

  • Initial choices – the concept, market positioning, strategy
  • The start-up Business Plan
  • Financing
  • Strategic Leadership & Operations Management
  • Marketing & Sales Management
  • Managing growth, performance & profitability
  • Succession plans & Exit strategy

Lessons shared on all of those subjects can be enhanced by storytelling. Let’s assess the difference between real-life stories and creative fiction for two important issues:

  1. Bank financing
  2. Business valuation

Some extracts from my two business books and the three novels will allow us to compare the stories and the impact for those two issues.

Fact: Real life stories:

  1. Financing:
  • “Don’t take that to the bank.”  Too much information that dampens the enthusiasm.
  • “The answer is still NO!” Even the best business plan may not get the financing you need, because it does not meet the needs of the lender or investor.
  1. Valuation:
  • “Your business is worth how much?” The calculated value was three million, he sold it for six million to a strategic buyer.
  • “What you want is not what you’ll get.” Don’t include your sweat equity and pride in the price, the buyer doesn’t care.

Fiction: Crime novels:

As told in NO EASY MONEY, SIMPLY THE BEST, MERGER MANIAC Stories of a successful young entrepreneur in the computer business of the 1980s threatened by the Mafia and corruption and working to save his business and his family from disaster.

  1. Financing:
  • “It’s suicide to take on that much debt,” says the banker. “There’s no way we can help finance your growth.”
  • “We’ll give you two million, just don’t be late paying us back,” says the Mafia boss.
  1. Valuation:
  • “At three million, you’re dreaming in technicolour. Wake up!” says the big corporation. “I’ll wait until you’re in trouble and buy at a better price then.”
  • “You’re worth five million to us,” says the gangster, “but you gotta hire my boy, Lenny”.

Message received and lessons learned?

What are the differences for the entrepreneur?

Real-life stories:

  • More facts!
  • More details
  • More useful to understand and apply the strategies, tactics & techniques

Crime Fiction:

  • More fun to read!
  • More creative ideas and inspiration
  • Easier to remember and apply the guiding principles

What are the differences for the storyteller?

Real-life stories:

  • Need to be an experienced entrepreneur to tell real-life stories
  • Need to be an expert in management and entrepreneurship
  • Need to be good at communicating by storytelling

Crime Fiction:

  • More fun to write!
  • Introduces a new and wider audience
  • Requires more creativity to be interesting and entertaining
  • Able to be more subtle in the cheerleading for entrepreneurs and the promotion of Enlightened Entrepreneurship

I think we still agree, Entrepreneurs learn best by sharing stories. But the choice of fact or fiction is all yours.

All the books are available online or at your favourite bookstore. You may prefer the business textbooks, but try sharing the novels with your friends, family and critics to get a little more sympathy and understanding for entrepreneurs.

Be better. Do better.

Your Uncle Ralph, 

Del Chatterson

This subject will be be presented Live!

SPOTLIGHT PRESENTATION – STAPLES/BUREAU EN GROS

Kirkland, Quebec – July 11th, 6:00PM   

 

Enlightened Entrepreneurship

A wider perspective

9781496932259_COVER.indd“I’m only in it for the money.” Really?

Hardly anyone admits to it; most of us are accused of it.

Most of us already know that being motivated by personal gain and short term profit are losing propositions. We must have a higher purpose and satisfy a wider spectrum of interested stakeholders to achieve sustainable long-term success.

We have to continuously satisfy the needs and meet the expectations of employees and customers, suppliers and strategic partners, governments and regulators, our communities and the society around us.

Yes, it can be called recognizing our social responsibilities and yes, it can still be justified by the old free enterprise principle of being in our own self-interest, to make more money.

You do not have to be a dedicated, altruistic social entrepreneur to accept that every business is a social enterprise. Every business has to deliver products or services and employment with net benefits to society and a minimum of social and environmental impacts.

An enlightened entrepreneur is aware of those requirements and manages accordingly.

Be better. Do better.

Your Uncle Ralph, Del Chatterson

Join our mailing listfor regular e-mails with ideas, information and inspiration for entrepreneurs.

Check out Uncle Ralph’s books:"Don't Do It the Hard Way" and "The Complete Do-It-Yourself Guide to Business Plans" Both are available online or at your favourite bookstore in hard cover, paperback or e-book.

Under Promise & Over Deliver

But don’t Under Sell

Fast deliveryIt’s a popular mantra: Under Promise & Over Deliver

And it’s good advice to achieve higher levels of customer satisfaction. Promise delivery in the next 3-5 days, then deliver tomorrow. Wow!

Customers love it. Except those customers who did not order it, because they needed it in two days.

Cautious promises may be good for customer service but not good for sales to get the order in the first place.

Maybe the mantra should be: Promise to be better than the competition, then deliver what you promise.

Be better. Do better.

Your Uncle Ralph, Del Chatterson

 

 

Participative management

You cannot fake it

meetingIs your business run democratically? Probably not. Employees do not get to vote, managers are supposed to be responsible and make consistently good decisions. Let’s not confuse them with too many contrary, ill-informed opinions. We have seen too many unhappy conclusions from democratic decision-making lately.

It is easier to accept your role as lonely leader and try to be the gentle and wise, all-knowing autocratic decision-maker. “I am the owner, so I get to decide.” That’s true, but you will make better decisions with relevant input from the troops.

It’s called participative management. It means soliciting input before decisions are made and plans are set. It means seeking feedback on current operations and on the results from new initiatives. It cannot be a token effort with input that is subsequently ignored. It needs to be sincere and must include setting realistic expectations and responding promptly to suggestions, questions and complaints.

You will find that early participation in new initiatives will help develop better implementation plans and gain the support and commitment of the people required to deliver results.

Be better. Do better.

Your Uncle Ralph, Del Chatterson 

Visit LearningEntrepreneurship.com or contact DirectTech Solutions at www.DirectTech.ca for assistance on your strategic business issues, growth and profit improvement plans or your exit strategies.

Join our mailing list at LearningEntrepreneurship.com for ideas, information and inspiration for entrepreneurs.

Read more articles at:Learning Entrepreneurship Blogs. 

Click Here to check out Uncle Ralph’s books, "Don't Do It the Hard Way" and "The Complete Do-It-Yourself Guide to Business Plans" Both are available online or at your favourite bookstore in hard cover, paperback or e-book.

Modern managers are smarter

Are you?

Remember the bad old days when managers judged performance by all the wrong indicators?

angry bossA managing partner who questioned a consultant ready for promotion because, “I’m not sure of his commitment to the firm, I never see him taking his briefcase home at night.” Not noticing the same consultant was usually going home after six and had a roster of very happy clients.

Or the ambitious manager promoting himself by denigrating a colleague for arriving late to his staff meeting, ignoring the fact he was the same individual willing to forego family obligations to attend corporate events on evenings and weekends.

Modern managers are more likely to look at real performance, not work habits or personality traits. Judging and rewarding for results, not effort and time spent at the office. Enabling work-life balance and accommodating family needs to improve employee satisfaction.

There is a very enlightening book on the subject, called First, Break all the Rules © 1999, by Marcus Buckingham and Curt Coffman, based on a study of high performance managers and how they succeed through their employees. The essential theme is to ignore the rules and standard company policy, treat everyone differently. Don’t try to change who they are and how they work, find out what they like to do and are good at, then let them do it their way.

Modern managers do not follow the lead of their rule-bound old-fashioned predecessors. Which group are you in?

Be better. Do better.

Your Uncle Ralph, Del Chatterson

Visit LearningEntrepreneurship.com or contact DirectTech Solutions at www.DirectTech.ca for assistance on your strategic business issues, growth and profit improvement plans or your exit strategies.

Join our mailing list at LearningEntrepreneurship.com for ideas, information and inspiration for entrepreneurs.

Read more articles at: Learning Entrepreneurship Blogs

 

Click Here to check out Uncle Ralph’s books, "Don't Do It the Hard Way" and "The Complete Do-It-Yourself Guide to Business Plans" Both are available online or at your favourite bookstore in hard cover, paperback or e-book.

Evolving

People and processes

The founder and CEO of Uber, Travis Kalanick, is stepping aside because his combative personality and the culture he created at Uber are no longer in line with the business’s need to be both more stable and predictable and more socially responsible and engaged with the communities where it is operating. His ruthlessly aggressive style has successfully created a ride-sharing industry and grown it to a billion dollar global business, but he had bruised relationships with everyone – employees, drivers, customers, service suppliers, regulators and politicians. Those partners that Uber needs to succeed were instead creating obstacles and seeking more compatible alternatives. It has been clear for some time that change was required at Uber – in leadership, style and processes – if global expansion was to continue. Kalanick finally got the message.

stressed employeeWhat about your business? Are the right people in the right place? Are you?

Has your business evolved beyond the capabilities of the people who got you started? Back then you were looking for energy, enthusiasm, entrepreneurial spirit and people willing to do whatever was required without costing too much. In the early stages, you, your partner and the office manager were all willing and able to do the sales, administration and customer service, make the coffee in the morning and set the alarm at night. The technician was also the shipper-receiver and the receptionist was also secretary and bookkeeper. The business was smaller and life was simpler.

Now you need more specialized expertise with knowledgeable and experienced management all working together effectively using more sophisticated technology and tools for marketing, sales and customer service, managing more employees with widely varied backgrounds, keeping on top of regulatory requirements, running the business on smart phones and keeping systems secure. Even the coffee machine is more complicated and needs a specialist.

Those early employees deserve your loyalty and respect and should have the opportunity to learn and develop into larger roles, but they will not all be capable of evolving in line with the needs of your evolving business. Energy and enthusiasm can only get you so far. (Maybe that helps explain what is holding you back from evolving to the next level in your business.)

You do not have to get as big as Uber before the people and processes that got you started are no longer helping you succeed and grow. Check that your organization has evolved as much as the competitive world around you.

Be better. Do better.

Your Uncle Ralph, Del Chatterson 

Visit LearningEntrepreneurship.com or contact DirectTech Solutions at www.DirectTech.ca for assistance on your strategic business issues, growth and profit improvement plans or your exit strategies.

Join our mailing list at LearningEntrepreneurship.com for ideas, information and inspiration for entrepreneurs.

Read more articles at:Learning Entrepreneurship Blogs. 

 

Click Here to check out Uncle Ralph’s books, "Don't Do It the Hard Way" and "The Complete Do-It-Yourself Guide to Business Plans" Both are available online or at your favourite bookstore in hard cover, paperback or e-book.

Manage like a Hockey Mom

But in a good way

hockey-fansIt is that time of year for hockey playoffs and not just in the NHL. It’s always exciting and entertaining and often provides inspiration and ideas for outside the hockey rink.

At a grandson’s recent Peewee AAA hockey tournament in Montreal, the welcome brochure included the Quebec Hockey Association’s Code of Ethics for Parents (also useful for grandparents). In reading it, I realized it could be adapted as a useful guide for business owners and managers. Here is my version.

The Code of Ethics for Entrepreneurs

As a business owner and responsible manager, I recognize that I have the potential and the opportunity to make an important contribution to the personal development and well-being of the individuals who choose to work with me and accept that as a priority over “winning the game”.

I will therefore ensure my conduct continually demonstrates that:

  • I understand that my employees are here for their benefit and pleasure, not mine.
  • I consider winning as part of the pleasure of playing the game; I will not exaggerate the pain of failure; and I will recognize errors as a necessary part of the learning experience.
  • I will respect the efforts and the decisions of the supporters and supervisors and of the outside authorities responsible for enforcing the rules and regulations. I will do my best to understand and accept the rules and regulations applicable to my business.
  • I will recognize good performance on the part of our individual employees, as well as that of our competitors.
  • I accept each individual’s limitations and will not project my own ambitions or unreasonable expectations upon anyone. My expectations will be appropriate to the qualifications and experience of each individual.
  • I will demonstrate and expect from all employees a reflection of the important values of respect, discipline, effort and loyalty.
  • I will not encourage or tolerate any level of personal harassment, conflict or aggressive behavior.
  • I will encourage and support the personal development of the skills and capabilities for every individual.

Good advice from responsible hockey moms. (I do notice that a lot gets ignored during the playoffs when winning is everything, but that’s another issue for a future article. Meanwhile, the hockey analysts are all over it.)

Be better. Do better. As a responsible, enlightened entrepreneur.

Your Uncle Ralph, Del Chatterson

Read more at:Learning Entrepreneurship Blogs. 

Join our mailing list for more ideas, information and inspiration for entrepreneurs.

Click Here to check out Uncle Ralph’s books, "Don't Do It the Hard Way" and "The Complete Do-It-Yourself Guide to Business Plans" Both are available online or at your favourite bookstore in hard cover, paperback or e-book.

Take a break

It’s spring

on-the-beach #2I know it’s blowing snow and -7C in Montreal today, but all the kids and parents are talking about Spring Break, so let’s take apply the concept more generally. Take a break.

Take a break from all the distractions that keep us from making progress on improving our lives, achieving our business objectives, supporting family and friends and making a difference in the world.

Take a break from exaggerated news headlines, from outrageous political rhetoric, from ranting celebrities and activists of all stripes and briefly set aside your concerns for the victims of terrorism, natural disasters, racism and systemic discrimination. Take a break from the business issues that demand attention. Stop trying to manage everything for a week or so, let nature take its course and the markets run where they will. Try not to watch.

Take a break and turn your attention to thoughtful and intelligent commentary from sources you do not normally have time for. Reflect on your own assessment of the big issues. (Then check off a few of the small things you have been neglecting so that you can feel better about accomplishing something useful during the break, instead of just worrying about everything.)

Take a break to assess your personal priorities and time commitments, then re-align your plans to get on track.

I highly recommend regularly taking a break.

Spring or otherwise.

Your Uncle Ralph, Del Chatterson

Read more at:Learning Entrepreneurship Blogs. 

Join our mailing list for more ideas, information and inspiration for entrepreneurs.

Click Here to check out Uncle Ralph’s books, "Don't Do It the Hard Way" and "The Complete Do-It-Yourself Guide to Business Plans" Both are available online or at your favourite bookstore in hard cover, paperback or e-book.