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The secrets revealed! How to be a successful Enlightened Entrepreneur

Thank you for your interest in the STAPLES SPOTLIGHT EVENT , Wednesday evening, August 19th, on Enlightened Entrepreneurship

 

Be a successful Enlightened Entrepreneur

Have a Purpose and a Plan

Avoid the Big Mistakes

I wanted to follow-up with this article and also to provide the ZOOM meeting recording for your review , in case you missed it.

If you chose on registration to Opt-in to future mailings, I have added your email address to the current list for my occasional newsletter, Ideas for Entrepreneurs.  You may, of course, Join our mailing list now or Opt-out anytime.

The full -hour ZOOM recording is available now.   Check out the video at: https://share.vidyard.com/watch/km8duQnk3bjrBsy1ZSCZwM?

You may wish to quickly scan through to the specific slides or topics that interest you most.

I hope you are doing well with your own challenges as an entrepreneur and will join me in the cause of supporting and promoting Enlightened Entrepreneurship.

Thank you for your interest in how to be a more successful Enlightened Entrepreneur

Be better. Do better.

And please take care of each other,

Your Uncle Ralph, 

Del Chatterson

 

How to be a (more successful) Enlightened Entrepreneur

Two simple principles - Have a Purpose and a Plan. Avoid the Big Mistakes.

Join us and learn how to be a (more successful) Enlightened Entrepreneur.

Two simple principles - Have a Purpose and a Plan. Avoid the Big Mistakes.

August 19th, 2020 - 7:00 PM.

To learn more and register for the event see more details at: EventBrite - STAPLES VIRTUAL EVENT

Two simple principles explained:

  1. Have a Purpose and a Plan.
  2. Avoid the Big Mistakes.

Learn more from Your Uncle Ralph's new 2020 Editions of his two books for entrepreneurs, see: Business Books at LearningEntrepreneurship.com

What is an Enlightened Entrepreneur?

  • Building a sustainable business based on loyal, long-term, profitable customer relationships
  • While recognizing and respecting the needs of Employees, Customers, Business Partners, Communities, Society and the Planet

D-I-Y Business Plan

Fail to plan, you plan to fail.

Remember

  •  It’s about the Process, not the Product.
  • To succeed you need – a solid Business Plan
  • For Startup, to manage Growth & to Exit

The Seven Biggest Mistakes

  1. Too Entrepreneurial
  2. Lack of Strategic Direction
  3. Focus on Profit
  4. “Let’s do it again!”
  5. Neglecting Key Relationships
  6. Poor Marketing and Sales
  7. Personal Distractions

How to Avoid Them? 

Balance!

  • Entrepreneurial Instinct with Planning & Analysis
  • Strategic Vision with Operational Detail
  • The Logical Head with the Intuitive Heart
  • Short-term Profit with Long-term Value
  • Personal Priorities with Business Objectives

Two simple principles - Have a Purpose and a Plan. Avoid the Big Mistakes.

August 19th, 2020 - 7:00 PM.

To learn more and register for the event see more details at: EventBrite - STAPLES VIRTUAL EVENT

 

Thank you for your support during pandemic protocols

Boston Pizza demonstrates Enlightened Entrepreneurship

Recently tested over a pizza and a glass of wine, Boston Pizza restaurant staff showed exceptional empathy and understanding of how to be a socially responsible business and build loyal customer relationships.

It started with a decision to try patio dining at a Boston Pizza restaurant on Montreal’s South Shore commercial strip after a pleasant drive in the countryside. We observed all the cautious protocols of wearing a mask, using hand sanitizer and sitting far from other guests before we ordered. Wait staff were appropriately masked and respectful.

Then shock and dismay – there was leftover lipstick still on the wine glass! Not appreciated anytime, but especially disturbing during pandemic paranoia and our hypersensitivity to any deficiencies in cleanliness and sanitation meant to reduce the risk of spreading Covid-19. The wait staff immediately understood our alarm and three of them came individually to our table to personally apologize and reassure us that they were very aware of the concerns and they were doing absolutely everything possible to keep customers safe and comfortable.  They insisted on cancelling the full $43.00 cost of the meal.

We were grateful and impressed with their immediate personal attention to customer care.  They made us feel comfortable again and cemented our loyalty to Boston Pizza. The most remarkable lessons for entrepreneurs?  Delegate decisions to front-line staff and let them make it personal. The character they demonstrate reflects your corporate personality, be sure it’s what you want it to be.

All business management will be tested during these challenging times, but good management will be rewarded by the support of loyal long-term customers. It is the essence of Enlightened Entrepreneurship – building a sustainable business based on loyal, long-term profitable customer relationships while recognizing and respecting social responsibilities to all employees, customers, business partners, the local community, society and the planet.

Are you an Enlightened Entrepreneur?

Be better. Do better.

Del Chatterson, your Uncle Ralph

Learn more about Enlightened Entrepreneurship at: LearningEntrepreneurship.com

Read more of Uncle Ralph's advice for Entrepreneurs in Don't Do It the Hard Way & The Complete Do-It-Yourself Guide to Business Plans - 2020 Editions.

 

Read more articles at: LearningEntrepreneurship Blogs

 

Checklists for the re-start of your business after Covid-19

Good management is required now more than ever.

Looking back over the past three months, you may be thinking, OK, that was painful, but it has to get better from here. For most of us, the negative impacts of the coronavirus pandemic on our businesses were unexpected disasters and the final consequences are not yet entirely understood. Nevertheless, we have to try and work our way out of it.

So what are the right management strategies and action plans to get through this economic turmoil and uncertainty with a more resilient and stable business?

Here are the lessons we’ve learned from previous economic crises and business setbacks:

  1. Do not rely on the headlines.

The media are not helpful to you.  They will provide neither balanced reporting nor insightful analysis for input to your planning or decision making. You will have to dig deeper. Make sure your market data and competitor intelligence is current and accurate.

  1. Communicate. Communicate. Communicate.

Keep employees and customers informed. They may be worried, confused and need to be reassured that they can count on you. You may not have good news for them, but they will appreciate hearing directly from you and are not being left guessing what's coming next.

  1. Keep on Selling.

Now is not the time to cut back on marketing and sales. Your efforts now will be even more conspicuous and effective if your competitors back out of the market and away from their customers. Be selective and very focused. Work on building stronger customer relationships by being relevant and responsive to the current economic circumstances.  Avoid the cry for help advertising that only confirms “we’re desperate and we need the sales.” Customers are looking for strength, not weakness. Calmness, confidence and competence are much more appealing to potential buyers who are still healthy and want reliable long term suppliers.

  1. Do quickly what obviously needs to be done.

If it’s clear to you it's also clear to the people affected. They’re waiting for you to act and will be more confident and proactive themselves, if they see you taking action. Face the facts, don't fight the facts.

  1. Adapt.

Remember Darwin's survival of the fittest: those who adapt to their environment are most likely to survive; not the strongest or the biggest. This is not the time to be stubbornly persistent about your plans. Look around and be creative. Your destination may still be the same, but the route, the vehicle and the passengers may need to be changed.

  1. Be confident, but cautious.

Recognize the difference between calculated risk and a hopeful optimism. Make a decision if the potential outcomes and their probabilities are reasonably clear, but hold fire if they’re not.

  1. Show conspicuous leadership.

No one can do it better than the person who is ultimately responsible and can speak with sincerity and integrity on the concerns, strategies and plans. Lead by example, not by rhetoric.

A 10 point diagnostic to develop the short-term action plan for your business

From my experience, most businesses benefit from a regular health check – a business diagnostic that takes a thorough look at the whole business and identifies priorities and the potential for better performance.

At this point, for the recovery and survival of your business after the coronavirus shutdown you need to take a closer look at these 10 checkpoints and identify the most urgent priorities to get your business up and thriving again in the new business climate of 2020.

  1. Start with an updated strategic plan. Find your last business plan and review it against the new business environment and operating protocols. Prepare the new road map with clear milestones and a timetable to achieving your revised business objectives.
  1. Use your updated strategic plan to guide management and employee decision making. Monitor results against the plan. Review, revise and react quickly to customer responses and the changing business environment.
  1. You’re still in a competitive business: Are you keeping score? Compare your key performance indicators to the top performers. Learn from experience and adjust as necessary to achieve better results.
  1. Evaluate your performance in re-building long-term loyal relationships with customers, suppliers and strategic partners. Ensure you are showing your loyalty in return. You will need the support of all of them.
  1.  What about the people you need most: your employees? Get their feedback on any new concerns. Do they still believe you’re a great place to work?
  1. Assess each of the six P's in your marketing mix in the new post-Covid world – Product, Positioning, Promotion, Price, Packaging, and Placement. Fix what's broken.
  1. Assess your corporate image against the biggest and best brands in your business. Do you still look as good as you really are compared to them?
  1. Re-evaluate your online services. Are your competitors raising customer expectations? Do it better now. Don’t wait to be asked. And remember to turn the WWW upside down and think MMM – Manage, Market, and Monitor for improved results online.
  1. Review all your marketing communications. Do they capture the four C’s – Current, Clear, Concise and Consistent? Make them relevant and appropriate to the new business climate.
  2. Review the use of information and automation technologies in your business. Are they part of the solution or part of the problem in responding to new demands for productivity and performance?

Share these ideas with your management team and use them to improve performance. You will do even better when we get closer to normal business conditions again and there should be fewer areas to improve on when you do the next business diagnostic.

Good management will be tested during these times, but good decisions now will mean a better business in the post-Covid future.  Keep at it and we’ll get there together.

Be better. Do better.

Del Chatterson, your Uncle Ralph

Learn more about Enlightened Entrepreneurship at: LearningEntrepreneurship.com

Read more of Uncle Ralph's advice for Entrepreneurs in Don't Do It the Hard Way & The Complete Do-It-Yourself Guide to Business Plans - 2020 Editions.

Read more articles at: LearningEntrepreneurship Blogs

 

The Magic of Entrepreneurship

Demonstrated by the street vendors in Rome

Find the magic of entrepreneurship. In the post-Covid-19 world you will need to be more creative, determined, flexible, responsive and persistent than ever. Be better. Do better.

What entrepreneurs do best is identify an opportunity and respond to it. They observe the market, test customer response and then deliver what works at the right time and place.

As a tourist in Rome a few years ago, I noticed that the street vendors had almost all decided that the thousands of meandering tourists were most in need of either bottled water or a selfie-stick. Those were apparently the best-selling impulse items and they were offered everywhere. I did appreciate the water bottles during long tours of the ancient ruins in the hot sun, but was already hating the forest of selfie-sticks that were invading all my carefully composed souvenir photos and did not want to join in the contest of who could get their cell phone farthest out in front of everyone else.

The street vendor sales strategy was simple and effective. A quick assessment of the passing prospects, a polite query then a quick decision to sell or move on to the next prospect. No time wasted on harassment or an obnoxious sales pitch. Pricing was competitive, one Euro for a bottle of water where the vendor was one of many and had a large stockpile and two Euros if he was alone in a remote corner with limited stock. The vendors also knew they were competing with bottles refilled from available public drinking fountains at no cost, so they all sold clearly branded and sealed bottled water that was ice cold.

But most impressive was their quick response to an unexpected thunderstorm and downpour chasing the tourists under cover. Like magic, suddenly all the street vendors were offering small collapsible umbrellas and cheap plastic rain ponchos!  Quality and price were not an issue, we needed them here and now, so sales were brisk for those that had them.

It was an impressive demonstration of effective sales tactics for entrepreneurs, whether you are a street vendor, a technology guru or the owner of a small business. Be ready to respond to your market, rain or shine.

Be better. Do better.

Del Chatterson, your Uncle Ralph

Learn more about Enlightened Entrepreneurship at: LearningEntrepreneurship.com

Read more of Uncle Ralph's advice for Entrepreneurs in Don't Do It the Hard Way & The Complete Do-It-Yourself Guide to Business Plans - 2020 Editions.

Read more articles at: Learning Entrepreneurship Blogs. 

Yes, you need a Business Plan

From Start-up to Exit

It may seem unnecessary, uncreatively old-fashioned, boringly bureaucratic, and inappropriate for your brilliant business idea where you “dare to be different.” Nobody wants to look at a thick document full of industry jargon, market research mumbo-jumbo and spreadsheets up the ying-yang, do they?  Sorry, but yes they do.

The most important people for support of your plans will need convincing that you have done your homework and that you’re capable of delivering the results you expect. So don’t argue, just do it. Or if you still need convincing, read on.

Why Do You Need a Business Plan? 

It has a purpose. 

The most common reason for preparing a business plan is, “because the bank asked for one.” That is probably why most readers of the Guide to Business Plans are here. And that is obviously a legitimate reason for doing one.

But why is the bank asking for one? And do you need one for the same reasons? The answer is as simple as the familiar cliché: If you fail to plan; you plan to fail.

It’s hard to know where you’re going and how you’re getting there without a plan. It’s even harder to manage your progress if you haven’t defined your destination and set the milestones to monitor along the way. What route are you taking? What type of vehicle are you using? Who’s driving and who are the passengers? Why?

The bank, and any other investor or business partner, wants the answers to those questions to assess whether or not you are likely to succeed and whether or not they want to support you.

You need a business plan for all the same reasons.

Every business needs one, from the start-up to the exit.  

Documenting a Business Plan is an extremely useful process to focus the owners and the management team on their business model, strategies, and operating plans. The process will force consensus and decision making that might otherwise be neglected. It requires issues to be resolved and the conclusions to be documented after testing alternative solutions and their financial consequences.

A well-documented business plan will help you communicate the most important elements of your strategy and plans to the people who need to know them the most. Including you.
Maybe you’ve been successful in business for many years and never had a business plan. It's still a good idea for all the same reasons.  And now is a good time.

Maybe you’re ready to exit your business. Even better. A solid business plan will be the most important document you have to support the value of your business for sale or transfer to a new owner.

The greatest value of a business plan, however, is always in the process – involving your management team in a thorough examination of your business; its purpose, its strategies and its plans to ensure success. When it’s completed, all the key players will be more knowledgeable of the issues, the opportunities, the risks and the alternative paths considered and the reasons for the choices that were made; before committing to the final plan.

For a small business start-up, that management team may only be you. Maybe you’d rather keep your plans to yourself. But the business plan is still a valuable exercise. It forces you to answer all the questions that you should ask yourself and that will certainly be asked by the next people to get involved.

With a well-documented business plan you will be better prepared to meet all the challenges and more likely to succeed.

Be better. Do better.

Del Chatterson, your Uncle Ralph

Learn more at: LearningEntrepreneurship.com

Read more in Uncle Ralph's books of advice for Entrepreneurs: Don't Do It the Hard Way & The Complete Do-It-Yourself Guide to Business Plans - 2020 Editions.

 

Best Advice Ever

And it still applies - Don’t Waste Time!

One of the bizarre side effects of the economic shutdown and being told to self-isolate and work from home is that the pressure to be productive and meet deadlines seems to have evaporated. The sense of urgency has dissipated. Everybody is preoccupied with the pandemic and keeping themselves safe more than meeting their obligations at work.

With lots of time to ourselves, procrastinating is easy. Nobody’s watching. Who cares anyway? It can wait until we’re more in the mood for it. It’s a bad attitude and a bad work habit to get into.

This article from Uncle Ralph’s Random Ramblings in DON’T DO IT THE HARD WAY, is a timely reminder to make better use of the time available to you, pandemic or not.

The Best Advice I Ever Got

In three words: DON’T WASTE TIME.

In providing the following background story, I may appear to be ignoring that advice by taking more time to write about it and requiring you to take more time to read about it.

But the advice is really about making choices on how to use the limited time available in one lifetime. It does not exclude learning, relaxing, or quiet contemplation instead of continuous frantic activity. In this case, I am choosing to reinforce the message and help make it memorable by telling the story (in keeping with the theme of the book). You may choose to read it for the same reasons.

I was at UBC in Vancouver in 1964, my first year in Engineering. All first-year engineers were given the Engineering Handbook providing all the advice and information we needed to successfully complete the following four years of study. The book was full of useful material and started with welcoming comments from the Dean of Engineering, the University President and other dignitaries with all the usual flowery clichés expected in these messages.

One page was reserved for Steve Whitelaw, President of the Engineering Undergraduate Society. Steve was a popular President with a reputation as a very bright, creative leader. That reputation was based on his leadership in a number of engineering student stunts that made the national news, like the time they kidnapped another university’s mascot or hung a VW beetle from the Lion’s Gate Bridge.

His biggest coup was bringing to a conclusion the long campus debate over some weird concrete modern-art sculptures that appeared one-year on compass. They had received the scorn and contempt of ‘ignorant and uncultured’ engineering students, but were vigorously defended by the arts faculty and administration.

The intensity of the debate exploded on campus and in the local newspapers on the day the engineers went on a rampage and completely destroyed all the sculptures leaving them in heaps of broken concrete and steel. That’s when Steve finally advised everyone that the engineers had built and installed them all in the first place.

So his advice in the Engineering Handbook would have attracted our attention. It was a blank page with his signature and just three words:

DON’T WASTE TIME

Call it leading by example.

Be better. Do better.

And take care of each other,

Del Chatterson, your Uncle Ralph

Learn more at: LearningEntrepreneurship.com

Read more in Uncle Ralph's books of advice for Entrepreneurs: Don't Do It the Hard Way & The Complete Do-It-Yourself Guide to Business Plans - 2020 Editions.

 

Starting-up is hard to do

Re-starting in a pandemic is even harder

It’s time to pull out your original business plan and start re-thinking and re-writing it. Assuming you have one, I’m sure it didn’t include a contingency plan to survive a pandemic shutdown. Now you need a new plan to re-start your business in a world recovering from the coronavirus pandemic.

The value of having a plan and the process of preparing one remain the same as ever. Answering the original start-up questions again. Why am I doing this? What do I hope to accomplish? Who cares? How can I succeed?

Go back to basics. Develop a strategy and operating plans that are relevant and appropriate to the new realities of the next phases of the global pandemic. Don’t chase short-term opportunities. Somebody else will be better at manufacturing personal protective equipment or designing a contact tracking app. Focus on leveraging your unique strengths and capabilities into a new sustainable plan for long-term growth and profitability. Take advantage of the willingness of employees and customers to accept change and to demonstrate their loyalty to your business. Respond in kind with sincere gratitude and appreciation for their support.

Don’t make it complicated, the objective is to prepare a one page summary that answers these questions clearly and concisely:

  • What is the purpose of the business?
  • Who are the target customers?
  • What are the investments required to re-start?
  • What is the revenue required to be profitable again?
  • How soon can we get there?

The detailed analysis and planning needs to include your management team. Their input and commitment to the plan are essential before communicating it to employees and customers.

Some additional useful tips from The Complete Do-It-Yourself Guide to Business Plans:

  • Review how competitors are adapting their business model in response to new restrictions and new opportunities.
  • Test alternative scenarios and their impact on the expected financial results.
  • Do not force your forecasts beyond reasonable expectations into the realm of hopeful fiction to arrive at a happy ending.
  • If the plan doesn’t work, revise it and try again.
  • Confirm the support of strategic partners, especially for financing.
  • Define specific measurable performance objectives and a timetable with set milestones.
  • Continuously monitor the results and make necessary changes to achieve your performance objectives.

It was not easy getting started the first time. It will not be easy to get back on track delivering valuable products and services to customers and meaningful employment to your staff. It will require the same determination, creativity and teamwork that worked the first time.

Be better. Do better. And take care of each other,

Del Chatterson, your Uncle Ralph

Learn more at: LearningEntrepreneurship.com

Read more in Uncle Ralph's books of advice for Entrepreneurs: Don't Do It the Hard Way & The Complete Do-It-Yourself Guide to Business Plans - 2020 Editions.

 

Do-It-Yourself Business Plan? Yes, you can!

What? Why?

What is a Business Plan? What are the results you  want?  

Good questions. Here are my answers.

A business plan is a document that describes your idea for realizing a business opportunity. It describes the market need that you have identified and the proposed strategies and plans to turn your idea into a profitable business.

The business plan is a communications tool to be used with all the prospective participants in your project. It will identify and confirm the business opportunity, define your proposed business model for responding to that opportunity and describe the strategies, operating plans and financial results that you expect.

It is not exactly a sales document, but it will be used to sell your concept and approach to convince sources of financing and strategic business partners to participate in your plan.

An acceptable Business Plan will include a detailed and comprehensive description of the planned project or new venture with extensive financial analysis and projections, plus supporting material that might include executive profiles, product brochures, facilities plans and market research studies.

The three key components in a Business Plan therefore, are:

  1. A clear, persuasive description of the business opportunity and your strategies and action plans to respond to it.
  2. A complete detailed set of financial projections confirming the investment required and the expected future profitability.
  3. Supporting documentation that confirms the objective research and analysis for the conclusions, proposals and projections shown in the plan.

The Complete Do-It-Yourself Guide to Business Plans will explain:

  • How to prepare all the elements required for a complete business plan package
  • How to get the most out of the process
  • How to get the results you want.

Why Do You Need a Business Plan? It has a purpose. 

The most common reason for preparing a business plan is, “because the bank asked for one.” That is probably why most readers of this Guide are here. And that is obviously a legitimate reason for doing one. But why is the bank asking for one? And do you need one for the same reasons?

The answer is as simple as the familiar cliché: If you fail to plan; you plan to fail.

It’s hard to know where you’re going and how you’re getting there without a plan. It’s even harder to manage your progress if you haven’t defined your destination and set the milestones to monitor along the way. What route are you taking? What type of vehicle are you using? Who’s driving and who are the passengers? Why?

The bank, and any other investor or business partner, wants the answers to those questions to assess whether or not you are likely to succeed and whether or not they want to support you.

You need a business plan for all the same reasons.

Every business needs one, from the start-up to the exit.  

Documenting a Business Plan is an extremely useful process to focus the owners and the management team on their business model, strategies, and operating plans. The process will force consensus and decision making that might otherwise be neglected. It requires issues to be resolved and the conclusions to be documented after testing alternative solutions and their financial consequences.

A well-documented business plan will help you communicate the most important elements of your strategy and plans to the people who need to know them the most. Including you.

Maybe you’ve been successful in business for many years and never had a business plan. It's still a good idea for all the same reasons.  And now is a good time.

Maybe you’re ready to exit your business. Even better. A solid business plan will be the most important document you have to support the value of your business for sale or transfer to a new owner.

The greatest value of a business plan, however, is always in the process – involving your management team in a thorough examination of your business; its purpose, its strategies and its plans to ensure success. When it’s completed, all the key players will be more knowledgeable of the issues, the opportunities, the risks and the alternative paths considered and the reasons for the choices that were made; before committing to the final plan.

For a small business start-up, that management team may only be you. Maybe you’d rather keep your plans to yourself. But the business plan is still a valuable exercise. It forces you to answer all the questions that you should ask yourself and that will certainly be asked by the next people to get involved.

With a well-documented business plan you will be better prepared to meet all the challenges and more likely to succeed.

Be better. Do better.

And take care of yourself,

Del Chatterson, your Uncle Ralph

 Learn more at: LearningEntrepreneurship.com

 Read more in Uncle Ralph's books of advice for Entrepreneurs: Don't Do It the Hard Way & The Complete Do-It-Yourself Guide to Business Plans - 2020 Editions.

 

Switching from Defense to Offense

Are we there yet?

Do you know your Basic Defensive Interval? For a business start-up, it’s the number of weeks or months before you get to break-even cash flow. For an operating business, it’s how long can you survive a disaster without any revenue. You may have business interruption insurance or a disaster plan, but how much cash did you have set aside to carry you through such an event? We always knew there were unpredictable economic and business risks that we could not prevent or avoid.

None of us were prepared to manage through a global pandemic that would shut down normal business activity for two or three months. Maybe six months to two years before we get back to anything approaching normal business activity. Now is not a good time to discover we cannot survive that long without income.

We are approaching the end of phase one of the 2020 coronavirus pandemic, we hope. We have slowed the spread of infections to allow health care workers and facilities to handle the case load. Is it time to start switching from defense to offense? Caution and constant monitoring will be appropriate as businesses reopen and people go back to work, but it’s time to get ready.

The tactics for good management through any business crisis or disaster remain the same:

  • Demonstrate conspicuous and effective leadership. Lead by example. Show compassion and understanding of the pressures and the anxieties everyone is feeling.
  • Assess the new business environment and the new protocols and regulations in place and the changes going forward.
  • Determine current employee and customer needs and expectations and the most effective responses from comparable businesses in your industry.
  • Stay focused. Avoid being distracted by the bombardment of pandemic news. Don’t freeze. Don’t over-react. Be calm, rational, reassuring and pro-active.
  • Don’t neglect the good news. Look for the silver lining in the dark clouds – maybe we’ve learned something beyond working more effectively from home.

Some Enlightened Entrepreneurs and political leaders are demonstrating how it should be done. You can learn from them too.

In summary:

Be brave, be flexible, be creative. Be informed, make decisions, take action. Communicate, communicate, communicate.

Be better. Do better.

And take care of yourself,

Del Chatterson, your Uncle Ralph

 Learn more at: LearningEntrepreneurship.com

 Read more of Uncle Ralph's advice for Entrepreneurs in Don't Do It the Hard Way & The Complete Do-It-Yourself Guide to Business Plans - 2020 Editions.

 

 

 

 

Be better. Do better.

And take care of yourself,

Del Chatterson, your Uncle Ralph

Learn more at: LearningEntrepreneurship.com

Read more of Uncle Ralph's advice for Entrepreneurs in Don't Do It the Hard Way & The Complete Do-It-Yourself Guide to Business Plans - 2020 Editions.

 

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